Seniors

Hurling & Camogie

Fast, furious, exciting and physical, Hurling is considered by many as the most skilful game in the world. It’s also one of the oldest, with its traditions set in the midst of ancient Irish history.

Hurling and Camogie (the female version) are hard-hitting, high-paced, stick (called a hurley) and ball (called a sliotar) games. Played by teams of 15 on a rectangular grass pitch with H-shaped goals at each end, the game combines skills from lacrosse, field hockey and baseball.

Players may strike the ball on the ground, or in the air, and may catch the ball or pick up the ball with their hurley into their hand. They can then carry it for a maximum of four steps with the sliotar in their hand. After those steps the player may bounce the ball on the hurley and back to their hand, but it is forbidden to catch the ball more than twice. Players can run balancing or bouncing the sliotar on their hurley (called a solo) indefinitely. Players may contest for the ball by playing it with the hurley or by shoulder charging an opponent side-to-side.

To score, you strike the ball over the crossbar with the hurley for one point, or under the crossbar and into the net for a goal worth three points.

Gaelic Football

Gaelic Football is the most popular of the Gaelic games. Played on a rectangular grass pitch with H-shaped goals at each end, the game is high octane, full of speed, precision, accuracy and intensity.

Played by teams of 15 players, with a round ball that’s slightly smaller than one used in soccer, both hands and feet are used to control and pass the ball with the ultimate aim of scoring goals.

The ball can be carried in your hand for a maximum of four steps and can be kicked or “hand-passed” – a striking motion with the hand or fist.

After every four steps the ball must be either bounced or dropped onto your foot before kicking it back into your hand (called a “solo”).

Players may not bounce the ball twice in a row, and may contest for the ball by playing it with the hand or by shoulder charging an opponent side-to-side.

To score, players put the ball over the crossbar by foot or fist for one point or under the crossbar and into the net by foot or hand/fist for a goal worth three points.

The Basel GAA Seniors team trains on Tuesdays & Thursdays at Rankhof from 6.15pm – 7.45pm between March and October. Sessions are mixed-gender and split between Hurling / Camogie and Football. For more information email secretary.basel.europe@gaa.ie